Can You Freeze a Fondant Decorated Cake?

You Can Freeze a Fondant Covered Cake

Can You Freeze a Fondant Decorated Cake?   Yes you can!!  But up until a couple of months ago – I wasn’t sure.

A couple of years ago when I was taking way too many orders, I found myself baking and freezing cakes ahead of time just so I could keep up with my workload.  But those were either plain baked cakes, or baked, filled & crumb-coated cakes… but never decorated cakes – especially fondant covered.

But then I had an unusual situation come up back in July.    One of my clients ordered a fondant covered/decorated cake for a specific date… then had to change the party to the next weekend…  but forgot to tell me.  Oops!

In addition to that, when I messaged to tell her her cake was ready for pickup (on the original weekend) she was out of town (actually, a couple of states away from home) and couldn’t get the cake even if she wanted to.  Ugh.  I was frustrated.  I hated to waste that cake – and the time I had invested in making it!

Plus I was completely booked the next weekend and knew I probably wouldn’t have time to redo the cake for her then.   So I took a chance and I decided to freeze a completely finished, fondant covered cake.

Wrapped Frozen Saints Cake

I wrapped it up in four or five layers of heavy duty plastic wrap (I buy mine at Sam’s Club) then I stuck it in the freezer for 6 days.  I read that some bakers also wrap it in foil over the plastic wrap, but I only used plastic wrap.

The night before the cake was to be picked up, I took it out of the freezer and put it in the refrigerator (still wrapped in plastic wrap).  I left it there overnight – probably around 12-14 hours.

The next morning I set it out on the counter and I let it come up to room temperature.   Again, I left the plastic wrap on.

As it started to warm up, condensation appeared on the outside of the plastic wrap, so I didn’t touch it – I let it sit.  Probably 6-8 hours later (late that afternoon/evening), I unwrapped it!

Note: the condensation had completely disappeared after around 3-4 hours, but that time will vary depending on your climate, temperature and humidity!

Saints Cake

And guess what?  It held up beautifully!!   It didn’t even get sticky!!   Although if it had, I suspect letting it air-dry or turning a fan on it for a little while would’ve resolved that too!

Saints Birthday Cake

My biggest worry was that the condensation would cause sweating and that would cause color bleeding or running… but I think keeping the plastic wrap on was the answer to that!    No moisture ever showed up on the fondant itself!

SO – this is my only experience with freezing a fondant covered cake, but if I had to, I’d definitely do it again!  Here’s what I’d recommend:

  • Wrap the cake with multiple layers of heavy duty plastic wrap, and possibly foil on top of that!
  • Freeze for no more than a month (that’s just a good rule of thumb for any frozen cake)
  • Allow the cake to first thaw in the frig – at least 8 hours, keeping the plastic wrap intact.
  • Bring it to room temperature for at least 4 hours, again, keeping the plastic wrap intact.
  • If it gets sticky or has any condensation on the actual cake, allow it to air-dry or place it in front of a fan – do not touch it, wipe it or handle it!

It’s YOUR turn!  Do you freeze cakes?  Do you have any tips or tricks… tell us how you do it in the comments!    Also leave a comment if you have other questions!

 

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How to Decorate Simple T-Rex Dinosaur Cookies

How to Decorate Simple T-Rex Dinosaur Cookies

I find it quite funny that I’ve written a tutorial that involves decorating cookies.  I tell people all the time that cookies aren’t “my thing” and yet… I continue to find myself in the middle of decorating them!

Having said that, if I’m going to write a cookie tutorial, you better believe it’s going to be a simple one… Ha!

Are you ready?   First, you’re going to need some basic tools…here’s my list:

Here’s what you’ll need:

When you get everything together, hop on over to CakeJournal.com and get the full tutorial!

WAIT!  Before you go… would you like to see more cookie tutorials from me?   If so,  how are your skills when it comes to cookie decorating?  Are you an expert?  A beginner?  Somewhere in between?      Please leave me a comment!

This post contains affiliate links which means that, at no additional cost to you, I may earn a small commission if you make a purchase. Thanks so much for your support in this way! Read my full disclosure policy here.

How to Make a Fondant Bandana Knot

How to Make a Fondant Bandana Knot

I’ve made a lot of cowboy themed cakes and many, many of them have had a bandana knot on them (see the links and pics at the end of this post).  Almost every time I’ve posted one of those cakes, I get asked about making the knot and finally… I took pics!

One quick question… is it bandana or bandanna?  I always write with one “n” but my spell-check keeps trying to correct me!   What do you think?

I looked it up in the Merrium-Webster dictionary and apparently two “n’s” is correct but I did find in the alternate spellings near the bottom that one “n” is okay too.

Ugh… I say it’s one “n” – so that’s what you’re gonna get from me for the rest of this post.  Okay?  Okay!

So here it is… How to Make a Fondant Bandana Knot!  This post is going to be long so I’m going to skip my usual rambling and get straight to it!  Here’s what you’ll need:

And if you want to finish the pattern…

Here’s my cake.  It was thoroughly chilled and ready to go:

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 01

Step 1:  Roll out your fondant (I use The Mat) to the appropriate diameter to cover your cake and lay it over the top!  This also works much easier if you have your cake on a turntable.  My favorite is this Ateco #613 turntable.

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 02

Step 2:   Using your fondant smoothers, smooth down the fondant around the back on either sides of the cake – leaving it loose on the front (or wherever you want the knot).

I couldn’t put my smoothers on the cake while simultaneously taking a picture, so you’ll just have to use your imagination.

Smoothing Fondant

And here’s the front (with it smoothed all around the sides and back:

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 05

Step 3:  Begin slowly pulling the loose fondant together and gathering it near the bottom, while gently stretching and smoothing it:

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 06

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 07

I use my smoothers to pull it in tight… and get it clean!  At this point I realized I really wanted some pics with my hands, so I asked my son to come help me out!

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 08

Step 4:  When it’s like you want it, tear off the excess fondant and smooth it down a bit – that will not be your knot!   ;)

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 09

I used an Xacto knife to take off a little more of the excess…

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 16

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 10

Step 5:  Using your Pastry Wheel (or whatever tool you prefer), cut off the excess fondant around the edges of the cake.  I like to cut as close to I can straight up and down (see second pic below) – not angling in at all.  It makes that bottom edge smooth!

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 11

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 12

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 13

Now here you’re going to have to use your imagination.  I had forgotten that I really wanted a wood grain finish on the cake board so I had to take care of that.  However, I didn’t take pics.  How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 14

If you’re curious, I basically just rolled out some brown fondant, cut a strip and wrapped it around the cake… gluing it down with sugar glue.

When it was attached, I used a wood grain mat to add texture!   I put the seam directly under the knot because I knew it would be covered up!

Now back to the bandana!!

Step 6:   Roll out some extra fondant… this was probably 6 inches by 8 inches. You won’t really need that much!

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 15

Step 7:   Cut out 3 strips (ignore that there are only 2 below)  - each about an inch wide.  I don’t measure these things and it’s a little different every time, but there’s no need for precision, so it’s all good!    Roll one into a ball – around 1″ diameter!

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 17

I check it against the cake to be sure it’s a good size.  You can add or take away until to get a good size – just know that you’ll be adding more strips on the outside in a minute, so the finished product will be a little bigger than the ball is now!

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 18

Step 8:   Cut two strips of fondant.  Fold one in half length wise and leave the other as-is.  First lay the flat one over the ball, then the folded one over that. Once they’re both lined up, just fold them around and pinch off the excess.  Smooth it down to have a finished knot.  Check out the pics below if I’ve confused you.  I’m sure I have.

The knot

Step 9:   Using a Tear Drop Cutter, cut out two tails for the knot and pinch them together on the rounded ends… (If you don’t have the tear drop cutters, you could easily free-hand this – again, there’s no need for sharp precision!)

Knot tails

Step 10:  Use some sugar glue to attach them to the front of the cake.

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 27

Step 11:  Glue the knot onto the front and you’re done!!

How to Tie a Fondant Bandanna Knot 28

And the knot is done!!

Finished Fondant Bandana Knot

I didn’t take pictures of finishing it up, but it wasn’t hard at all!  I used nesting Comma Cutters  to do a few different sizes of black and white paisleys.

I glued them on (with sugar glue), then used a black food marker to add the dots!

OH, and I added the black ribbon around the board to cover up the rough edges!

I also used that little curved square cutter to add one more shape… not sure what it’s called but it’s from this Mini Cutter Set.   If you don’t like that, you could add tiny flowers like I did on this recent Cowgirl Horse Cake.   And you could add silver edible pearls for a little bling… see here:

Fondant Bandana

Anywho… I digress!  This is the finished cake:

Cowboy Baby Shower Cake

Do you have any questions about making a fondant bandana knot?  If so, leave me a comment and I’ll do my best to answer!!

See all of my other cowboy cakes by scrolling through these posts and you can see a few of them here …

Cowboy Bandana Cakes

 

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